concrete lifting

Kir Luong

Inspired Forum Member
Registered
Nov 4, 2015
38
3
8
47
#1
Does anybody have any experience with concrete lifting or have other suggestions to deal with sunken concrete in garages ? It's about 25% of the total space in the garage that will need to be lifted (in my case) or redone to achieve a nice slope for proper water drainage since this garage is somewhat heated.
-some companies use polyurtheane
-Mud-jacking is the traditional way of doing things
-ripping out the area and redoing the concrete.

What have you done in the past for your sunken driveway?

Thanks,

Kir.
 

kfort

Senior Forum Member
REIN Member
Sep 1, 2010
1,458
244
83
#2
Mid jacking is effective and reasonably priced (when compared to re pouring).
 

Kir Luong

Inspired Forum Member
Registered
Nov 4, 2015
38
3
8
47
#5
Yeah, form injection injection is around 2000 in my case, but it really depends on how much form is needed. I thought about coring some holes in to the concrete and trying to make piles or stabilize the concrete from further subsidence. Then pouring a levelling agent on to correct for slope, then finishing it off (blend it in as best as possible). This would only be a few hundred dollars . However, still thinking of alternatives.
 

Kir Luong

Inspired Forum Member
Registered
Nov 4, 2015
38
3
8
47
#7
you could look into renting mud jacking equipment your self, or the poly style and try using that on your own. that would greatly reduce the costs, and get you a good result.
Really? where would you rent this equipment? I'm not afraid with concrete work and have poured sidewalks before (with not bad looking results too).
Thanks for the tip! With many houses, a lot of concrete surfaces are not ideally sloped for proper drainage, so some sweat equity might be worth considering.

Kir.
 

BradEarthWide

New Forum Member
REIN Member
May 7, 2012
28
3
3
34
Edmonton
www.earthwidhomes.com
#8
Just called my local rental guy, he wasn't sure, but you could search companies that sell the equipment, and see if they sell to anyone that rents it. I have to admit, I did just assume that if they make it there is someone that rent's it these days.
 

Mike Fetherling

New Forum Member
Registered
Nov 14, 2015
2
2
1
49
#9
Hey Guys - I just happened to stumble across this discussion and thought I'd add my opinion...I raise settled concrete with polyurethane foam professionally. ChrisDavies is correct - foam will last longer than traditional mudjacking material. Although, I am not aware of being able to rent this type of equipment, and would not personally advise trying to figure out how to do this without some experienced help. There is a bit of a learning curve to it. If you were able to find something/someone to work with, I would at a minimum suggest that you look at the entire area of the garage floor in addition to the 25% that is obviously settled. Just because you only see 25% settled doesn't not mean that there is not a larger problem going on. We always drill injection holes outward from the settled area and regularly find voids present in 50% to 75% of the entire area. Those areas should be filled to provide support throughout the slab to prevent future problems.

Finally, do take caution to not over lift the settled area. Once the foam generates lift, it does not go back down without the help of a jackhammer.

Feel free to contact me if you have questions, or lookup our website: Acme Concrete Raising & Repair Inc.
 

CurtisMelissa

New Forum Member
REIN Member
May 10, 2011
19
1
3
#10
Hey Guys - I just happened to stumble across this discussion and thought I'd add my opinion...I raise settled concrete with polyurethane foam professionally. ChrisDavies is correct - foam will last longer than traditional mudjacking material. Although, I am not aware of being able to rent this type of equipment, and would not personally advise trying to figure out how to do this without some experienced help. There is a bit of a learning curve to it. If you were able to find something/someone to work with, I would at a minimum suggest that you look at the entire area of the garage floor in addition to the 25% that is obviously settled. Just because you only see 25% settled doesn't not mean that there is not a larger problem going on. We always drill injection holes outward from the settled area and regularly find voids present in 50% to 75% of the entire area. Those areas should be filled to provide support throughout the slab to prevent future problems.

Finally, do take caution to not over lift the settled area. Once the foam generates lift, it does not go back down without the help of a jackhammer.

Feel free to contact me if you have questions, or lookup our website: Acme Concrete Raising & Repair Inc.
Hello Mike,
Where are you located? I am looking for a quote on this service in the St Albert/Edmonton area.
Thank you!
 

Mike Fetherling

New Forum Member
Registered
Nov 14, 2015
2
2
1
49
#11
Hello Mike,
Where are you located? I am looking for a quote on this service in the St Albert/Edmonton area.
Thank you!
Hi Melissa - I'm actually in the Chicago area. Here are a few companies in your area that use polyurethane for lifting concrete:

POLYTEK 360 INC. 855.360.POLY (7659)
Concrete Resources Inc. (780) 910-8105


I hope this helps - Mike