October 2015 U.S. Economic Fundamentals

Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
16,745
70
48
Langley
#1
U.S. shale towns grapple with new real estate crisis brought on by oil plunge: ‘We are overbuilt’

After struggling to house thousands of migrant roughnecks during the boom, the state faces a new real-estate crisis: The frenzied drilling that made it No. 1 in personal-income growth and job creation for five consecutive years hasn’t lasted long enough to support the oil-fuelled building explosion.

Civic leaders and developers say many new units were already in the pipeline, and they anticipate another influx of workers when oil prices rise again. But for now, hundreds of dwellings approved during the heady days are rising, skeletons of wood and cement surrounded by rolling grasslands, with too few residents who can afford them.

Read the full article here.
 

Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
16,745
70
48
Langley
#2
U.S. job growth disappoints, raising doubts of Fed rate hike; or US economic recovery

U.S. employers slammed the brakes on hiring over the last two months and wages fell in September, raising new doubts the economy is strong enough for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates by the end of this year.

Payrolls outside of farming rose by 142,000 last month and August figures were revised sharply lower to show only 136,000 jobs added that month, the Labor Department said on Friday.

Read the full article here.
 

Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
16,745
70
48
Langley
#3
U.S. job growth disappoints, raising doubts of Fed rate hike; or US economic recovery

U.S. employers slammed the brakes on hiring over the last two months, raising new doubts the economy is strong enough for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates by the end of this year.

Payrolls outside of farming rose by 142,000 last month and August figures were revised sharply lower to show only 136,000 jobs added that month, the Labor Department said on Friday.

Read the full article here.
 

Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
16,745
70
48
Langley
#4
U.S. shale oil is staring into the abyss and OPEC will push it over the edge

In this instance the most profitable producers are Saudi Arabia and its close Gulf Arab allies who effectively control the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

To their credit, shale drillers and operators in Texas and North Dakota have hung on for far longer than anyone expected after OPEC launched its pre-emptive oil price war last November. However, a year of oil prices trading at an average of around $50 per barrel is finally succeeding in reversing the dramatic increases in U.S. production which had been so troubling the Gulf’s oil-rich sheikhs.

Read the full article here.