Tenant`s Insurance

llee

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Jun 22, 2008
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Ottawa, ON
#1
An agent on the phone (PC Insurance) said tenant`s insurance is very important (we all know that). However, he added that landlord should pay the tenant to carry it (if the tenant insists no having one). The reason is that if the tenant has no liability coverage, and if someone sues them (for example, water damage to other unit), the landlord might be held liable.

Is it true? It seems unreasonable to me.
 

PropertySolution

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May 6, 2010
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Edmonton, Alberta
#2
QUOTE (llee @ May 19 2010, 07:30 AM) An agent on the phone (PC Insurance) said tenant`s insurance is very important (we all know that). However, he added that landlord should pay the tenant to carry it (if the tenant insists no having one). The reason is that if the tenant has no liability coverage, and if someone sues them (for example, water damage to other unit), the landlord might be held liable.

Is it true? It seems unreasonable to me.


It has been my experience that the majority of Tenants have no issue with carrying insurance once I provided them with general information and names of a few companies that offer good deals for Tenants. For those who do not provide me with proof of Tenant insurance I would not provide it for them. But of course you carry your own insurance. So your insurance company will address any repairs and related costs while things are being hashed out. You should also be covered for any law suits that result.

I have had the disturbing occasion to deal with a Tenant who`s suite caught fire. The unit was totally destroyed and there was smoke damage to the common areas & other units as well as major damages done to the roof (it was a top unit) The Tenant did not have insurance but my insurance company paid for all the repairs and related costs while an investigation was being done. It was determined that the Tenant left a faulty air condition plugged in which started the fire while she was away. So at this point it was up to my insurance company to pursue the Tenant for costs. This is why they make the big money.
 

bizaro86

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Jan 29, 2008
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Calgary, AB
#3
QUOTE (PropertySolution @ May 19 2010, 09:51 AM) It has been my experience that the majority of Tenants have no issue with carrying insurance once I provided them with general information and names of a few companies that offer good deals for Tenants. For those who do not provide me with proof of Tenant insurance I would not provide it for them. But of course you carry your own insurance. So your insurance company will address any repairs and related costs while things are being hashed out. You should also be covered for any law suits that result.

I have had the disturbing occasion to deal with a Tenant who`s suite caught fire. The unit was totally destroyed and there was smoke damage to the common areas & other units as well as major damages done to the roof (it was a top unit) The Tenant did not have insurance but my insurance company paid for all the repairs and related costs while an investigation was being done. It was determined that the Tenant left a faulty air condition plugged in which started the fire while she was away. So at this point it was up to my insurance company to pursue the Tenant for costs. This is why they make the big money.

It sounds to me like the insurance company treated you fairly. Do you mind sharing which company your policy was with?

Michael
 

PropertySolution

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May 6, 2010
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Edmonton, Alberta
#4
Oh sure ask me to remember 9-10 years ago LOL It was South something. The owner of the building was related to the owner of the reseller but I believe that only helped in the premiums. I still see the owner from time to time, I will be sure to ask him for the name.

But that does remind me, the same insurance company handled the flood we had in 2000. You may remember this if you were in the industry at the time. I had Lamplighter Apts. in Edmonton at the time. We had a massive flood in our parkade that put 2 under-ground parking levels and about 25-30 vehicles under water. Again, the insurance company covered everything and assisted in the legal actions that were filed. They of course did not cover the vehicles, the Tenants had to deal with that. There was a class action suite filed by some Tenants who did not have the proper coverage but we were found not liable.
 

invst4profit

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Aug 29, 2007
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Kingston Ontario
#5
Refusing to give the Landlords a copy of the contents insurance is a breach of the tenancy
agreement. Divisional Court in Stanbar Properties Limited v. Brooke (2005) Doc. Hamilton
04-212DV (Ont. Div. Ct.) held that breach of a tenancy agreement interferes with a lawful
right, privilege or interest of the landlord.


According to this Divisional Court ruling a LL that states in there lease agreement that tenant insurance is required can force a tenant to show proof of insurance. In Ontario a LL, facing the board requesting a eviction in the case of a tenant not having insurance,should site this ruling. Although the LTB does not have to follow or enforce it`s own rulings they will enforce Court rulings.

Although the Ontario LTB may not be interested in protecting landlord rights the courts do.