November 2014 B.C. Economic Fundamentals

Ally

Research Assistant
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Mar 24, 2009
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#2
More scrutiny needed of city halls across B.C.





We all need to start paying much more attention to what is happening at city halls across this province or unfair taxation and profligate spending will continue to undermine our communities.





The most obvious sign we aren`t paying attention is that we aren`t voting in municipal elections. While 60 per cent of us are voting for our federal politicians and half of us are voting provincially, only a third bothered to vote in the last municipal elections.










Read the full article here.
 

Ally

Research Assistant
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Mar 24, 2009
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Langley
#3
Vancouver's unaffordable housing: Can we move on?





Housing in Metro Vancouver is prohibitively expensive. There. Said that.





Now, can we please move on?





It`s a non-issue.





It`s a distraction that municipal candidates are wasting too much of their time on in their campaigns because ` while they would eagerly tap into the collective angst and, let`s be honest, the simmering prejudices the issue inspires ` there is practically nothing they can do about it. They are lying if they say they can.





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Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
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Langley
#4
Vancouver housing prices head towards new record high







Vancouver`s hot real estate market won`t be cooling off any time soon, says Canada`s national housing agency.




Housing prices in the Vancouver region are headed for a record high this year, and signs point to a continuing upward trend in Canada`s most expensive property market, fuelled by steady population growth and economic stability.





Read the full article here.
 

Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
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48
Langley
#5
Kelowna rents up, vacancies down





A new report has revealed some troubling trends in Kelowna's rental housing market.





According to the Community Trends report from the City of Kelowna, the rental market is very constrained.





Read the full article here.
 

Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
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48
Langley
#6
Home search leads Northwest BC mother to Alberta





A homeless mother of four is again calling for greater awareness of affordable housing problems facing northern B.C. after a five month homeless stint which has led her to seek a new path in Grande Prairie, Alberta.





During her nomadic adventures Anna Martin had been living with her family out of a van in campgrounds and emergency shelters while looking for a low income home or apartment ` first in Hazelton, then Terrace where they camped out at the city-owned Ferry Island campground for a period, Prince Rupert, Prince George and now across the border into Alberta.





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Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
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48
Langley
#7
Surrey light rail project passes first hurdle to secure federal funding





Surrey`s light rail transit ambitions are one step closer to reality after it received preliminary approval for federal funding from the P3 Canada fund.





According to the City of Surrey, the project has been granted `screened in` status, which means the proposal will now move on to the next phase for P3 federal funding consideration.





Read the full article here.
 

Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
16,745
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48
Langley
#8
Chilliwack keeps its competitive edge





Less red tape, taxes and fees in Chilliwack make it stand out on the provincial landscape for commercial development.





Chilliwack was just cited for its low fees and tax regime, and a very quick turnaround process for permits, in the 2014 municipal report card issued by Commercial Real Estate Development Association (NAIOP).





Read the full article here.
 

Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
16,745
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48
Langley
#9
Rise in migration to B.C. setting up scenario for housing price boost










British Columbia is starting to become a magnet again for people from other provinces, a trend that bodes well for Vancouver housing prices.





In the first half of this year, B.C. had a net gain of 3,270 people from other provinces. It marks a reversal of fortune for B.C., which saw a net loss in interprovincial migration of 4,596 residents for the full 12 months of 2012 and another net loss of 832 people last year.





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Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
16,745
70
48
Langley
#10
Can B.C. reclaim its competitive edge?





The Business Council of B.C. is sounding an alarm on a dirty little secret provincial politicians don`t want to hear about ` B.C. is no longer a competitive place to do business.





The Clark government does not want to hear it because its commitment to balanced budgets and whisker-thin surpluses leaves no cash to address the problem.





Read the full article here.
 

Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
16,745
70
48
Langley
#11
Young Vancouverites fleeing to more affordable pastures





Young people are increasingly leaving Vancouver to pursue better career opportunities and more affordable lifestyles.





While the Vancouver census metropolitan area continues to experience population growth, Statistics Canada numbers show that the Lower Mainland is actually losing residents aged 20 to 30 to other provinces.





Read the full article here.
 

Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
16,745
70
48
Langley
#12
Buyers undeterred by housing prices





`If nobody can afford to buy, how are people buying?`





That question, posed recently to delegates at a business conference in Vancouver by Cameron Muir, chief economist of B.C.`s real estate association, is a darn good one.





Read the full article here.
 

Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
Mar 24, 2009
16,745
70
48
Langley
#13
Site C and the importance of vision





For some British Columbians, the debate over the Site C project will bring back memories of a time when former Premier W.A.C. Bennett built a legacy of hydroelectric power that continues to benefit generations of British Columbians today.





It is no secret that opposition to large, visionary projects has always been the norm in our province. In the case of a project such as Site C, we are fortunate we have almost 50 years of experience from which to weigh the pros and cons.





Read the full article here.