Rental suited house with pool:

KhoaN

Inspired Forum Member
REIN Member
Oct 22, 2012
71
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8
Alberta
#1
Hi,

What are your thoughts of being a landlord of suited bungalow with separate entrance that has a swimming pool. Would it be better to give access to the upper level tenants and is it usually the landlord or tenants that maintain the pool? Or is it a bad idea to begin with?

House is in Ottawa, located in the central area.

Thanks,

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Tina Myrvang

Client Care Lead
Staff member
REIN Member
Nov 15, 2010
1,098
348
101
51
#3
Steps when considering a pool:

Contact your town or municipality
Each town will have its own definition of a “pool,” often based on its size and water depth. If the pool you are planning to buy meets the definition, then you must comply with local safety standards and building codes. This may include installing a fence of a certain size, locks, decks and pool safety equipment.

Call your insurance agent or company representative
Let your insurance company know that you have a pool, since it will increase your liability risk. Pools are considered an “attractive nuisance” and it may be advisable to purchase additional liability insurance. Most home-owners policies include a minimum of $100,000 worth of liability protection. Pool owners, however, may want to consider increasing the amount to $300,000 or $500,000.

You may also want to talk to your agent or company representative about purchasing an umbrella liability policy. For an additional premium of about $200 to $300 a year, you can get $1 million of liability protection over and above what you have on your home. This would also provide added liability protection when you drive.

If the pool, itself, is expensive, you should also have enough insurance protection to replace it in the event it is destroyed by a storm or other disaster.

Safety precautions:

Fencing around the pool area to keep people from using the pool without your knowledge. In addition to the fences or other barriers required by many towns, consider creating “layers of protection” around the pool, i.e. setting up as many barriers as possible (door alarms, locks and safety covers) to the pool area when not in use.

Never leave small children unsupervised—even for a few seconds. And never leave toys or floats in the pool when not in use as they may prove to be a deadly temptation for toddlers trying to reach them.

Keep children away from pool filters and other mechanical devices as the suction force may injure them or prevent them from surfacing. In case of an emergency, know how to shut off these devices and clearly post this information.

Be sure all pool users know how to swim. Learners should be accompanied by a good swimmer. If you have children, have them take swimming lessons as early as possible. And, don’t allow anyone to swim alone.

Check the pool area regularly for glass bottles, toys or other potential accident hazards. Also, keep CD players, radios and other electrical devices away from pools or nearby wet surfaces.

Clearly post emergency numbers on the phone, in the event of an accident. Keep a first aid kit, ring buoys and reaching poles near the pool. You may also want to consider taking basic first aid and CPR training.



Have a great day.
 
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KhoaN

Inspired Forum Member
REIN Member
Oct 22, 2012
71
19
8
Alberta
#4
Steps when considering a pool:

Contact your town or municipality
Each town will have its own definition of a “pool,” often based on its size and water depth. If the pool you are planning to buy meets the definition, then you must comply with local safety standards and building codes. This may include installing a fence of a certain size, locks, decks and pool safety equipment.

Call your insurance agent or company representative
Let your insurance company know that you have a pool, since it will increase your liability risk. Pools are considered an “attractive nuisance” and it may be advisable to purchase additional liability insurance. Most home-owners policies include a minimum of $100,000 worth of liability protection. Pool owners, however, may want to consider increasing the amount to $300,000 or $500,000.

You may also want to talk to your agent or company representative about purchasing an umbrella liability policy. For an additional premium of about $200 to $300 a year, you can get $1 million of liability protection over and above what you have on your home. This would also provide added liability protection when you drive.

If the pool, itself, is expensive, you should also have enough insurance protection to replace it in the event it is destroyed by a storm or other disaster.

Safety precautions:

Fencing around the pool area to keep people from using the pool without your knowledge. In addition to the fences or other barriers required by many towns, consider creating “layers of protection” around the pool, i.e. setting up as many barriers as possible (door alarms, locks and safety covers) to the pool area when not in use.

Never leave small children unsupervised—even for a few seconds. And never leave toys or floats in the pool when not in use as they may prove to be a deadly temptation for toddlers trying to reach them.

Keep children away from pool filters and other mechanical devices as the suction force may injure them or prevent them from surfacing. In case of an emergency, know how to shut off these devices and clearly post this information.

Be sure all pool users know how to swim. Learners should be accompanied by a good swimmer. If you have children, have them take swimming lessons as early as possible. And, don’t allow anyone to swim alone.

Check the pool area regularly for glass bottles, toys or other potential accident hazards. Also, keep CD players, radios and other electrical devices away from pools or nearby wet surfaces.

Clearly post emergency numbers on the phone, in the event of an accident. Keep a first aid kit, ring buoys and reaching poles near the pool. You may also want to consider taking basic first aid and CPR training.



Have a great day.
Thanks so much Tina!

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RedlineBrett

Senior Forum Member
REIN Member
Oct 24, 2007
2,290
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Calgary
#9
We managed a property with an indoor pool. Very difficult to get the tenants to service it the right way, so as an owner you would need to plan to arrange for it yourself. With the right schedule to the lease and appropriate insurance you can do it though, so if the deal you're looking at is good don't let this scare you off. If it's a suited property you would need both tenants on the pool use schedule which should be lawyered up with all the appropriate indemnities and RTA rules for your jurisdiction etc.
 

KhoaN

Inspired Forum Member
REIN Member
Oct 22, 2012
71
19
8
Alberta
#10
We managed a property with an indoor pool. Very difficult to get the tenants to service it the right way, so as an owner you would need to plan to arrange for it yourself. With the right schedule to the lease and appropriate insurance you can do it though, so if the deal you're looking at is good don't let this scare you off. If it's a suited property you would need both tenants on the pool use schedule which should be lawyered up with all the appropriate indemnities and RTA rules for your jurisdiction etc.
Thanks Brett!
It is a small and old pool. Do you think it would be better to get rid of it, fill with dirt and sod it instead?

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RedlineBrett

Senior Forum Member
REIN Member
Oct 24, 2007
2,290
45
48
Calgary
#11
If the amenity isn't going to get you enough increased rent to justify the maintenance and administrative expense then yeah it's probably cheaper and simpler to fill it in and not offer it to the tenants.


Thanks Brett!
It is a small and old pool. Do you think it would be better to get rid of it, fill with dirt and sod it instead?

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KhoaN

Inspired Forum Member
REIN Member
Oct 22, 2012
71
19
8
Alberta
#12
If the amenity isn't going to get you enough increased rent to justify the maintenance and administrative expense then yeah it's probably cheaper and simpler to fill it in and not offer it to the tenants.


Thanks Brett!
It is a small and old pool. Do you think it would be better to get rid of it, fill with dirt and sod it instead?

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Thanks!

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