September 2015 Economic Fundamentals

Ally

Research Assistant
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"A Tale of Two Markets: High Rise Sales Down Slightly while Low Rise Sales Boom"

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Ally

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If you own in Queen Mary Park in #Edmonton, tiem to get your voice heard on the big renewal project

Starting next Summer our streets, sidewalks, and streetlights will be replaced.

This process will take two years. In general, North of 107th Ave will be in 2016 and South of 107th Ave will be in 2017.


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Ally

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The final leg of the Edmonton ring road project still on schedule. Only months until opening is scheduled and over 82% of project completed. Transportation change will drive demand in the City's NE quadrant. Have you positioned yourself there yet?

"It's going well. We're busy. There's a lot happening," said Allan Neill, CEO of Capital City Link General Partnership, a construction conglomerate formed to build and maintain the final section of Edmonton's ring road under a public-private partnership (P3) model, for 34.5 years.

With 13 months until the road is slated to open, the project is about 82 per cent complete, said Neill.

Thirty-nine of the project's 47 bridges now have decks on them.

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Ally

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Facts vs ideology at play in Alberta. What do you think now that reality is beginning to settle in with the new government and new policies?

Alberta’s new premier, Rachel Notley (pictured above), has stirred up a bit of controversy over the way she has portrayed Calgary’s environmental record. In remarks made during a televised appearance, Premier Notley compares Alberta to that “embarrassing cousin no one ever wants to talk about.” In subsequent efforts to clarify her remarks, she finally settled on the claim that it’s only Alberta’s environmental performance under previous Progressive Conservative Party premiers that is embarrassing.

As the saying goes, everyone is entitled to their opinions. They are not, however, entitled to their own facts. And it’s on the facts that Notley stumbles, because Alberta’s environmental performance, much like any other Canadian province, has been one of continuing environmental improvement. Let’s look at some key indicators of environmental protection, starting with air quality.


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Ally

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Why Bloorcourt is one of Toronto's most diverse places to live

Despite being stood up by his potential landlord, Marc Serpa Francoeur felt he was home. He couldn’t view the apartment, but was standing under a sign that read “Ponta Delgada Bar,” a reference to his mother’s hometown in Portugal. Looking around, he saw the street alive with activity and knew he wanted to live in this area.

“I had a particular idea of the neighbourhood I wanted to live in. It would be walkable, ethnically diverse and have small commercial strips,” Mr. Serpa Francoeur says. A few weeks later, he moved into an apartment above the sushi restaurant across the street at Bloor and Dovercourt.

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Ally

Research Assistant
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Kitchener just enjoyed its largest annual growth spurt in 30 years

KITCHENER — The latest figures from the city's planning department show that residential growth boomed last year, with the municipality issuing more building permits than it has since Kitchener's last big growth spurt almost 30 years ago.

The numbers paint a picture of a city where development is split almost evenly between construction in "greenfield" suburbs and in the city's built-up areas — where apartments were a big part of the new housing in 2014, and where new types of home, such as stacked houses and clusters of low-rise buildings, are becoming more common.

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Ally

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Will this cause a resurgence? #Cambridge proposes nearly $350 million in capital spending over next decade

CAMBRIDGE — A new recreation complex, a new fire station and millions of dollars in downtown core improvements are among the proposed projects in Cambridge's ten-year capital forecast.

The document outlines a total of nearly $350 million in proposed spending on everything from roads and bridges to cemetery mausoleums and repairs to the old animal barns in Dickson Park.

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Ally

Research Assistant
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Orillia Community Improvement Plan to be discussed further at October meeting

For every dollar the city provides as an incentive through a proposed Community Improvement Plan (CIP), $9 in private investment can be expected.

That's the experience of Luciano Piccioni, president of RCI Consulting and developer of many CIPs, particularly in the Niagara region, who spoke to Orillia council committee Monday night about the Downtown Tomorrow CIP design principles.

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Ally

Research Assistant
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Metrolinx evaluating 50 new potential GO station locations

Metrolinx is evaluating 50 potential sites for new GO stations, including those identified in Toronto Mayor John Tory’s SmartTrack plan, in an effort to grow ridership and provide GO customers with more choices.

It’s not yet clear how many more stations the provincial agency will add as it expands GO with a regional express rail program that will see electric trains running, in some cases, at 15-minute frequencies.


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Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
LRT delays? Project faces challenges in Kitchener and Waterloo

Officials say they're confident quality issues with Bombardier streetcars that have plagued the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) won't be a problem here and delay the project.

"We're not at a stage where we're litigating or having an adversarial relationship with (Bombardier,)" said Darshpreet Bhatti, rapid transit director. "Right now our focus and their focus have been let's look at what needs to be done ... so that we can actually meet that target."

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Ally

Research Assistant
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Two ends of a boom town

Toronto’s once-derelict main street is in the midst of the most remarkable transformation in its history, with more than 20,000 condos that will house more than 30,000 people — the population of Orillia — under construction or in the planning stages.

And that’s just in a seven-kilometre stretch from Lake Ontario to the hotbed of midtown condo construction at Yonge St. and Eglinton Ave.


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Ally

Research Assistant
Registered
No sign of slowdown in Toronto as agents prep for fall housing market

Toronto’s fall housing market began gearing up this week – pretty much as soon as the folks at the Canadian National Exhibition had served the last chicken waffle on a stick.

For the past few weeks, real estate agents have been getting properties lined up and ready to launch on Tuesday morning.

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